FAQ – Bone Broth Acne Cure

I’ve received a ton of questions from my readers about the Bone Broth Acne Cure, both in the comments sections and via the Contact Me form. I’ve also started receiving questions through my Facebook page. All three are great ways to reach me if you happen to have a question too!

I’m always happy to help, but because I get a lot of repeat questions, I thought it might be useful to compile the most common questions into an FAQ page. As other questions come up, I’ll continue to add to this list. In the meantime, check out my handy dandy BBAC guide available for download.

CWB Bone Broth Acne Cure Recipe

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Also, guess what! I started a YouTube Channel dedicated to answering your questions about the Bone Broth Acne Cure! Woo!

Here’s the first video that explains how it will work. Click this link to subscribe to the channel and never miss an episode! They drop every Thursday at 2pm PST, but since more questions are coming, I might start doing two a week soon. If you have a burning question, never hesitate to ask! It might just end up getting answered on my YouTube station!

Don’t want to make your own broth? Check this out:

bone broth acne cure kettle and fire

Questions about the Bone Broth Acne Cure

How do you make your bone broth?

I use this recipe

Why isn’t my bone broth getting thick like jello?

You probably didn’t let it reduce enough when you were cooking it (or you left the pot covered the whole time). When you make your broth, you want to leave it uncovered and allow it to reduce down a few inches (depending on the size of your pot). Once it’s refrigerated, it should look like chicken jello. If you’ve cooked it between 8 and 24 hours, and you’ve left the pot covered or added water, all the good stuff is in there, it just won’t gel and will be slightly diluted. That’s ok too. 

I’m losing too much liquid when I leave the top off. Can I add more water in?

Yes, it’s ok to add more water. The final product might not gel, but that’s ok as long as you’ve cooked your broth for at least 8 hours — the longer the better. It might be that you started with too small a pot to begin with. I usually use a pretty big stock pot and let the liquid cook down 3 to 4 inches. If you’re using a small pot, that could be ALL your liquid! You might consider covering it to prevent as much water loss if you don’t want to make a bigger batch. 

There’s a layer of fat on my broth. what do I do with it?

You can scrape it off and a) give it to your pet, b) save it and cook with it, or c)  just toss it. If you don’t scrape it off, you’ll have a bit of an oil slick in your coffee mug when you drink it each morning. Not ideal, but not disastrous if you’re using organic or pasture chickens. If you’re using conventional, do not consume it. The fat is where all the toxins are stored in animals (and in people).

Do you reheat the broth before you drink it?

YES!! Unless you want to scoop chicken jello into your mouth with a spoon, heat it up before you drink it, and enjoy a nice warm mug of rich nutritious broth. 

FAQ bone broth acne cure

Do you use a microwave to reheat your broth? Aren’t microwaves bad?

Yes I use a microwave, but if you’re anti-microwave feel free to heat it on the stove. There’s no evidence that using a microwave is bad for you. I am not interested in arguing this point with anyone, so if you prefer a stove top, knock yourself out. Just enjoy your morning broth. ๐Ÿ™‚ 

What if I can’t find organic bones for broth?

If I can’t find organic bones, I use conventional so that I can stay on top of my regimen. It’s not ideal to use conventional, but something is better than nothing. That’s my opinion. My solution to this is to buy the largest quantities of organic chicken feet possible. When I find them, I just freeze them till I’m ready to make my next batch. I’m always on the lookout for organic chicken feet or backs when I’m at the store just in case. 

How big is your pot for bone broth?

It’s about a 3 gallon pot I think. (It’s giant)

How many jars of broth does a batch usually get you?

I usually get 10 to 12 jars of broth per batch.

My jars broke in the freezer. What happened?

You didn’t leave enough room at the top of your jar for the liquid to expand as it froze. I’ve done this too, so don’t feel silly. Next time, leave at least an inch of room at the top of the jar before you freeze it, and if you can leave the tops off until everything is frozen, that’s a good strategy too. Also, I’ve found that the giant jars break more often. 

How big are the jars you use?

I use multiple sizes, but they’re all in the 4 cup-ish range. I have apple sauce jars, raw sauer kraut jars, and I’ve also bought these tall mason jars (affiliate link). Here’s a picture of a batch of broth:

FAQ bone broth acne cure

How much apple cider vinegar do you put in your bone broth? 

I use about 1/4 cup in what I think is a 3 gallon stock pot. 

Where do you get your bones for broth?

I save bones from the bone-in meat we eat throughout the month, and I also buy chicken feet to make up the difference when I’m ready to make a big batch of broth.

How many bones do you use?

I use 3 to 4 lbs of bones for my giant 3 gallon pot (plus all my veggie scraps and even more veggies to add flavor — carrots, onions, garlic, celery, herbs)

Can I just use a whole raw chicken?

YES, I do that regularly. I will use the bones I have in the freezer + a whole raw chicken (or two), and I’ll take the chicken out at around hour 6 or so (once it’s cooked through but not cooked to death), and then I pull the meat off and eat it all week — I make chicken salad, chicken tacos, or whatever other fun dish I want. Because I always make A LOT of broth at a time, the bones from just one chicken wouldn’t cut it for me, but in a medium to large crock pot, it could be enough to get the gelatin you want.

Why do you need to let the bones sit in the apple cider vinegar?

It promotes the breakdown of the bones more quickly and thoroughly so you’re getting the most bang for your buck.

Can I use lemon juice instead of apple cider vinegar?

Yes you can! You can also use raw whey if you have it from cultured raw milk or kefir.

Do you still drink bone broth every day?

These days I drink it closer to 4 or 5 days a week. Sometimes I can’t get to making a new batch before I run out, but I try not to go longer than 2 weeks without it. I have found that at the three-week mark, I start to see some backsliding on my skin.

How long will it take for my acne to clear up?

For me, it took just two weeks of drinking bone broth every day. However, how long it takes for you will depend on the rest of your diet and lifestyle. I was already eating very clean, and I sleep well in general. Food, sleep, and stress are all factors in gut (and therefore skin) health. 

What do you do if you have a breakout?

I don’t really have full-on “breakouts” anymore, but I do get a few inflamed pimples from time to time. Now that the majority of my skin issues are under control, benzoyl peroxide actually works on an occasional blemish. That was never the case before I started drinking bone broth.

Will bone broth clear up my other skin problems? (eczema, psoriasis, etc?)

I don’t have any personal experience with those other skin conditions, but my post on the connection between gut health and skin health will encourage you to try it out and see if it helps!

Copy of CWB Bone Broth Recipe

(click to download)

30 thoughts on “FAQ – Bone Broth Acne Cure

    • Hi Inge! They’re both good, but I’ve read that if you have glutamate sensitivity that beef broth is better because there is less. I haven’t done enough research on this topic to know the details, so have a look around to see what you can find re: glutamate. I myself make almost exclusively chicken bone broth (because it’s easy for me to find chicken feet), and I’ve never had any issues with it. I know everyone is different when it comes to glutamate though. That’s my best answer!

  1. Thanks so much for posting your experience on here ๐Ÿ™‚ did you notice improvements in your acne before the 2 week mark, or did it take 2 weeks to notice a difference?

    • Hey Nicola,

      I honestly worked backwards to figure out the two weeks. After maybe the middle of the 3rd week, I was like, “wait a minute, my face has been clear all week!” and I worked backwards from there to figure out that the only thing I’d changed was adding in bone broth. It was probably gradual, but it was really after the two weeks that the bumpy feeling I felt when washing my face was gone. Let me know how it goes for you! Come back and tell me! Good luck!

        • I do still have PCOS. Bone broth cleared up my skin when I was on birth control, and when I went off of it about a year ago, I had some “skin hiccups.” I’m mostly back on track with an occasional zit around my period, but for the most part, bone broth still does the trick. I don’t currently take any hormones. I’m seeing a naturopath and need to work on some other symptoms that haven’t quite cleared, but at least acne isn’t one of them.

  2. Toni, I appreciate you “throwing things at the wall” =). Thank you!

    I have tried vitamin A (high doses), I also continue to consume chicken liver every day; no changes in skin with the vitamin A or liver.

    I have done allergy testing and chicken didnt show up.

    Yes..tested for candida and parasites as well, great smokies testing and typical tests. I have done many parasite and yeast cleanses throughout the years without getting any results.

    I was thinking of decorating my front door with the chicken feet for Halloween but decided against it. =)

    . I am going to give the beef broth a good two week try. A few years back I made a 24 hour broth with beef bones and it caused very bad insomnia..supposely some people have this effect. I hope this doesnt happen again. Fingers crossed. =)

    • Hey Lise, BBCo was the only bone broth I drank for 10 days and I didn’t backslide at all, but I’ve not tried more days than that in a row because I had some in the freezer when I got home from my vacation. There are so many frozen brands out there right now. I haven’t tried that exact one that you have (I don’t really want to say which ones I tried and didn’t pick to endorse — they’re all great products and I don’t want to make it seem like I don’t like them because I didn’t choose them). Not sure where you are in the world, but I’ve tried some different ones that are CA-based companies. I don’t know if there’s a difference for me using chicken or beef. Haven’t noticed one, so I guess that’s a no. I’d estimate that a coffee mug full for me is probably 10 to 12 oz. But I’m terrible at the marbles in a jar game. I’ll dump it into a measuring cup tomorrow morning and get back to you. Give it a go with the BBCo — it’s a super clean product, and really delicious considering they don’t add salt to it (I add a little because I’m kind of a salt lover, but not too much. Just a pinch! I definitley use a lot more in the big batches I make on my own.)

      • Thanks Toni for the info.
        You mentioned that one would need 7 boxes of BBCo broth for a two week trial..that would only be 8oz per day of broth (vs your mug full 10/12 oz). At 10-12 dollars per box that would very expensive to keep up! My 24oz package was $9.00 so that would be $4/day.
        But right now I have no choice because I live in a very health concious city and every organic store is always sold out of bones.

        I just heated up my first cup of the frozen broth that I purchased and notice it has droplets of oil floating on the surface. Does the BBCo version have these droplets? Does your homemade version? I couldnt get all the fat out of my homemade version even after skimming and cooling/scraping the top.

        Another question..if I were to use a whole chicken carcass how much water would I use to make a broth and how much broth would that yield?

        Sorry for all the questions.

        • Hey Lise, I measured my mug this morning, and it was exactly 9 oz. I don’t use the same mug every morning, so my guess is that I drink between 7 and 12 oz of broth each day. I’m not a big fan of measuring things in general in my kitchen, and I definitely don’t think an oz or two in either direction is going to make or break anything. The 16 oz boxes are two servings for me, so when I drink BBCo, I drink 8 oz per day. As far as the droplets, I”m not sure you’ll be able to eliminate every single droplet of fat (nor do I think that will make or break anything either). In your specific case when you seem to have some sort of unidentified trigger, I’m not sure if the fat is the problem, the gelatin (since you said the isolated gelatin is also no good) is the problem, or the glutamine is the problem (as was a problem for another reader), or what. Maybe it’s something else entirely. I wish I were a doctor so I could give you an allergy test or something, but alas, I’m not. You might try finding out when your butcher gets deliveries and ask him/her to save the chicken feet for you? Where do you live (if you want to answer that)? My recommendation as far as getting started would be to see where you are at 2 weeks straight, and if you’re all cleared up, drop down to 3 to 5 mornings a week (that’s what I do for maintenance, unless I run out, in which case sometimes I’ll go as long as two weeks between batches). Honestly, I’ve not had any serious backsliding (occasional zits here and there but nothing majorly demoralizing). I just really like drinking it every morning and I feel like it helps me continue to be able to tolerate dairy when before bone broth I couldn’t at all without major consequences. I hope that helps Lise! I know it seems like a puzzle to solve. Did you ever answer my question about trying probiotics? I can’t find it.

          • THanks for your thoughts and info about amount and fat. I live in Ferndale Wa..the butchers say they have problems even getting the bones they order( they mention the bone broth craze has effected the stock available -same issue with liver but less so).

            The broth that broke me out terribly with blackheads was entirely made from chicken feet (found easily in Seattle Whole foods). I still have a freezer full of chicken feet =)

            Knowing that my acne was causeed by antiboitics/gut issues I have tried practically every probitoic I could get my hands on for ten years now..some very expensive. I’ve cultivated my own as well. Best probiotics for stool improvements have been the yeast related probiotics such as boulardii and laterosporus. Ive noticed slight improvement with acne (and especially mood) when I implant bifidus rectally. Sauerkraut has good effect for stools but no effect on skin.

            I react to dairy even in small amounts, Im curious as to how much dairy you can now handle and what was your reaction?

            Thank you!!!

          • I still don’t do like gobs and gobs of cheese at once, but I can pretty much eat whatever dairy I want now. I used to have major gas with greek yogurt and painful cramps/gas with ice cream and now I get neither. For me, gas comes with quantity of sugar and fatty foods, so I’m sure if I ate a whole pint of ice cream, I’d see some problems but a normal serving gives me no trouble. Lise, have you ever been tested for parasites or a major candida issue? I wonder if taking all those antibiotics allowed some sort of parasite or candida infestation? No idea, just a thought. What about vitamin A? That’s something you’d need to talk to a doctor about dosing, but we tried that with my naturopath — sort of a more controlled, less extreme version of accutane under the supervision of a naturopath. Just trying to think of what could help since my way of doing bone broth isn’t working for you. Maybe it’s a chicken problem for you and beef would work better? Ever been tested for a chicken allergy? Just throwing things at the wall now … I wish you could send me your chicken feet. ๐Ÿ™‚

        • It doesn’t matter. It just matters if you do it. I do it first thing in the morning because otherwise I’ll be inconsistent. Sometimes I crack an egg in it, heat it up and then blend it in the blender with 1/4 to 1/2 an avocado. It’s delightful. ๐Ÿ™‚ (Loren thinks it’s weird, but I love it!)

          • Just thought of another questions..if bone broth ‘heals’ leaky gut why would one backslide after a time of not drinking it? Is it not a permanent healing that is taking place? Just curious..I would still continue the broth even if it wasnt permanent fix.

          • If you “heal” your gut wall but change nothing about your diet or lifestyle, what caused it to leak before will cause it to leak again. The broth will be more of a bandaid than a solution long-term. Make sense?

  3. Question about the “Bone broth Co”. broth you endorse..have you found it to be as much a cure as your home made broth? (ie have you drank it for over three weeks or however long it takes for you to backslide to know that it works just as well as your own?

    I just purchased a frozen brand called “Real Organic bone broth” and was wondering if you have tried it and if so how did it work for your skin?

    Can you tell a difference in your skin in using chicken vs beef bones?

    You mentioned you drink a mug full, can you say how many ounces per day?

    Thanks so much again and again! Im determined to give this a go.

  4. Hi – I’ve tried making the broth and had to add more water half way through the process because there wasn’t much left – is that OK?
    x

    • Hi Laura,

      Yes that’s ok. It might not gel, but that’s ok too as long as you’ve cooked your broth for at least 8 hours — the longer the better. It might be that you started with too small a batch to begin with. I usually use a pretty big stock pot and let the liquid cook down 3 to 4 inches. If you’re using a small pot, that could be ALL your liquid! You might consider covering it to prevent as much water loss if you don’t want to make a bigger batch. Let me know how it goes for you!

  5. What is your opinion of supplementing with gelatin powder? A healthy brand is called Great Lakes Gelatin on Amazon. You can add it to anything and it dissolves in cold or hot liquid without any taste. I figured since it was gelatin, as is the bone broth you make, what the difference would be in supplementing. Your thoughts?

    • Hey Suzanne!

      Great questions. I use Great Lakes Collagen Hydrolysate in smoothies. It’s a great, flavorless form of protein. It could definitely be an option to add some of that to a daily smoothie, but I’m not sure if it will improve your skin the same way because I’ve never tried it. The broth has a more comprehensive matrix leeched from the bones that just collagen, but collagen is a vital part of the formula. If you’d be willing to be a guinea pig and try it out every day for a few weeks, I’d love to hear how it goes for you! I do really like that product though.

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